CanAssist

University of Victoria

Together we CanAssist.

Families affected by dementia invited to test new CanAssist technologies

Latest News

NOTE: During 2016, CanAssist is looking for families affected by dementia who might be interested in testing technologies. Like the two devices described in the November 2015 news story below, these new technologies are designed to help people with dementia remain in their own homes for as long as safely possible, while at the same time reducing stress and worry for family and other caregivers.

There is no cost to eligible families – we simply ask that you provide feedback on the technology's effectiveness. CanAssist team members install the technology and provide training and support while you are using it.

If you think your loved one with dementia could benefit, please contact:

Megan Yon, Client Relations Coordinator
CanAssist at the University of Victoria

250-853-3874 or
myon@uvic.ca




November, 2015

Dementia is a fast-growing condition that is placing enormous strain on many Canadian families. CanAssist at the University of Victoria hopes to ease some of that pressure.

CanAssist recently began testing two new technologies aimed at helping people with dementia remain in their own homes for as long as safely possible, while at the same time reducing stress and worry for their caregivers. The technologies, funded by the BC Ministry of Health, are already having a positive impact on several families.

CanAssist is looking for families affected by early-stage dementia to test one of two new technologies:

The Wandering Redirect System.The Wandering Redirect System

Night-time wandering is a common concern for many families who have a loved one with dementia. The Wandering Redirect System uses common computer tablets to reinforce the time of day for the individual with dementia. At night, the system can deliver personalized video and audio messages to redirect individuals when they approach a home exit at inappropriate times. During the day, the system can be configured to display a calendar of events, including an audio reminders of the day's tasks and appointments. No computer expertise is required.

The Phone-in Monitoring System

Worried about leaving someone with dementia on their own at home? This technology uses a standard phone and small, unobtrusive wireless sensors to provide information to a family member about an individual's activity when he or she is home alone. Is the person still in bed? When was the bed vacated? When was the last movement in the home? By placing a phone call, the caregiver receives automated answers to these types of questions.

The technology would be installed by CanAssist's team at no cost to eligible families. Families would be asked to provide feedback on the technology's effectiveness and could keep the device at no charge for as long as it was useful.

If you think one of these technologies could benefit your loved one with dementia, please contact:

Megan Yon
Client Relations Coordinator
CanAssist at the University of Victoria
250-853-3874; myon@uvic.ca

Section Navigation: News